Stanford Project

While focusing on Giants team sets is something I foresaw when I felt myself being pulled back into the hobby, I quickly found that I was interested in anther project—namely collecting cards of Stanford Alumni.

Stanford was the local college team I grew up with and is my alma mater. I used to love going to games and getting autographs from the players. I only stopped when I became a teenager and the age difference started to feel too close.  I realized that there was a high probability of my going to a different college and so I figured continuing to be a Stanford fanboy wasn’t the wisest course of action. When I did get in and attend Stanford, it just felt weird to treat classmates that way. And then once I got older than the players it felt even weirder.

Getting back into card collecting made me realize that searching for cards of the guys I went to school with would be a fun project that could help me get more acquainted with the baseball card landscape that I missed after I quit in 1994. Since I’ve got all of 1987–1993 covered as well as a decent amount of 1986 and 1994, I also figured that I may as well include the guys who played before 1986 as well. So I put together a list and have even received some maildays already as a result.

I’m concentrating on Topps (and 1948–1955 Bowman) as the cards of record here. I’m not against or excluding cards from other brands, it’s just that they’ve often had their own distinct niches and I don’t feel like growing the wantlist that much yet.

Also, any players who predate 1948 Bowman are outside the scope of this due to there not being a proper card of record then. Though yes, getting a Bert Delmas Obak card* or an Ernie Nevers Zeenut card would be awesome even though they’re not even Major League cards.**

*Such as the one at The Met.

**I do have the Conlon Collection Nevers card however.

I’m also focusing on distinct Stanford people which is why I haven’t included Bobby Brown (despite him being in the Stanford Hall of Fame). It’s not just that his cards are a bit more spendy because they carry the Yankees surcharge. He also only played for Stanford for one year and ended up playing for two more schools before he went pro.

And there’s a grey area of baseball guys who went into football (Elway, Lynch, Hutchinson, Gerhart, Gaffney) which I should think about. I wouldn’t want a complete set of football cards of these guys but including a few of them might be fun.

Anyway, I figured it would be fun to start this project off by getting cards from the 1950s. This is a decade from which I had zero cards when I was a kid and so I get a little giddy still when I handle any of these. Also, there appear to be only four guys on the list who played in the 1950s. I bought three of them but decided to leave Chuck Essegian for the 1960s.

Lloyd Merriman

Lloyd Merriman 1950 Bowman Lloyd Merriman 1950 Bowman
Lloyd Merriman 1951 Bowman Lloyd Merriman 1951 Bowman
Lloyd Merriman 1953 Bowman Lloyd Merriman 1952 Bowman
Lloyd Merriman 1955 Bowman Lloyd Merriman 1955 Bowman

I’ve been a Topps only guy for ages so these are also the first vintage Bowman cards I’ve ever had. They’re fun. Printing is nice. It’s interesting to see how different the backs are compared to what I’m used to from Topps. I particularly love how the backs specifically mention Stanford—especially because these stem from a time before Stanford had become the academic powerhouse it is today.

Lloyd Merriman is also a nice throwback to when players routinely went off and did other things. That he was away in the military for a few years explains the gap between his 1952 and 1955 card. I’m a bit sad that I didn’t have an excuse to get a 1953 Bowman card but I’ll figure one out eventually.

Jack Shepard

Jack Shepard 1955 Topps
Jack Shepard 1955 Topps

Jack Shepard is an other example of a player doing more than just baseball. He continued his education in the offseason while he was playing pro ball and ended up going into business instead. As a result he has only one Topps card from his career.

Dave Melton

Dave Melton 1958 Topps Dave Melton 1958 Topps

Dave Melton on the other hand only played a dozen games in the big leages and spent most of his career bouncing around the Pacific Coast League. I do enjoy though that this card does double duty as both a Stanford Alumni card and as a sample of the Kansas City Athletics project I mentioned last week.

Anyway I wrote this post a while ago* and I’ve since acquired a bunch more Stanford Alumni cards. Many of them are more-recent players as I’ve been using this project as a method of catching up on the 1995–2016 baseball card landscape that I missed when I was away from the hobby. But I’m also gradually filling in the 1960s and 1970s guys and hope to be able to put together more posts like this as the project progresses.

*I blog in spurts and schedule them out well in advance.

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7 responses to “Stanford Project

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