So Marc exploded my mailbox

Marc Brubaker drops something in my mailbox so often that I may need to just commit to a monthly feature of posts about his maildays. I got another mailing early last week. Coming off a 4-day weekend and going into a snow day, the respite of sorting and cataloging cards was quite welcome.

One of the reasons Mark’s been able to send me so many packages and cards is that I’m building a few sets which are, for lack of a better word, junk. It’s cheaper  and easier to buy these as factory sets than it is to build them. But where’s the fun in that? Plus I already had hundreds of these as it is and the idea of those turning into duplicates makes me shudder.

Of course, that so many other people on Card Twitter have duplicates from these sets is what makes it so fun to build them by hand. Part of me is very grateful to be receiving help with these sets. And part of me knows that people like Marc are  just as grateful to be able to get rid of duplicates which are just wasting space in their homes.

Anyway these 1990 Fleers and Upper Decks don’t look like much but they take me to needing only 29 more Fleer cards and 37 Upper Decks. With 1991 Donruss only needing 22 cards to finish the set things are shaping up to a nice race to see which set finishes first.

I don’t have much to say about the cards themselves other than to note how despite being from the same year the gap in quality is kind of laughable. I actually like 1990 Fleer in its understated way but man Upper Deck blows it away on all fronts. I do like that Claudell Washington photo too.

Marc also included seventeen 2014 Topps cards to help with that set build. I’m over the 400 and past 60% on that build now too. The only problem is that since 75% of that build is in Series One it feels like I’m not even halfway there yet.

This set continues to grow on me too. I don’t like the file folder thing on the righthand side but other than that it’s a decent design. Some fun photos here too with the Denard Span and Russel Martin cards standing out in particular.

The real meat of this package looked to be in the big stack of Giants cards. The awful-airbrushed Rick Reuschel is an O-Pee-Chee card—something that’s always fun to encounter.* The Trevor Wilson and Kirt Manwaring Score cards are from one of their boxed sets that I apparently completely missed in the late-80s and now only have random cards from. Topps Big—even the less-exciting 1990s design— is always a treat.

*I’m especially tickled with the Reuschel because I just got an 88 Leaf Reuschel in a different mailing and had the same “is awesome” reaction. I never seek Canadian cards out but I always enjoy picking them up and hmm maybe I should listen to my emotions.

The complete set of 1992 Panini stickers is also a lot of fun. I avoided these when I was a kid. Stickers were clearly not cards to me. I sort of regret the decision now. As I’ve became more of a soccer fan I began to appreciate the Panini album culture a lot more. I’ve wanted to do one with my kids for the World Cup both because it looks fun and because it’s truly a global phenomenon that looks awesome to share in. Unfortunately I can’t justify the price for it. At all.

The other interesting thing about these stickers is that there are 9 stickers (plus a foil logo and a foil All Star) with a player for each position only there’s no starting pitcher. Also they’re not numbered based on scorekeeping order but instead go 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 9 ,8 ,7, 1—which makes me really curious to see how they were expected to be put into the book.

Some minor league fun in this next batch. Unfortunately I don’t recognize any of these names. Best part of this batch though is inching closer to completing some team sets. The Damon Minor Prospects card in particular finishes my 1999 Topps Giants set—my first complete team set from 1994–2006.

Other cards of interest in this batch are the Steve Scarsone 1994 Gold card and the Shawn Estes Metal Universe card. This is a much more sedate version of Metal universe than the multiple-armed Mark Gardner card Marc sent me previously. The Estes Fleer and Jeff Kent Ultra also deserve to be complimented on their photography.

I have an added appreciation for MLB Showdown now that someone’s posted the rules. Upper Deck Documentary continues to be wildly disappointing. In these three the “Left hander wins battle of Cy Young Award winners” card showing the clearly right-handed Matt Cain is most egregious in terms of not giving a shit about matching the photo to the event.

The Stan Lee First Pitch card is fantastic. RIP Stan. I don’t usually like these inserts but this is a clear exception. Especially now.

And rounding out the Giants with a few recent-year cards. The Andrew Suarez rookie is very nice given how he broke into the rotation last season. I dig the 2017 Heritage Team Card. Colored Posey parallel is interesting since I don’t chase these but have been curious to loupe them because of the way they deal with the 1983 border being extra-complicated is to fade out the spot ink. As such you can clearly see that it’s a spot ink being printed with an FM screen. The 2018 Donruss Madison Bumgarner is just nice to have because he didn’t have any Topps cards last year.

Moving into the Stanford portion of this mailing continues to surprise me with how many different guys Marc includes. Like I understand if he sends surplus Astros cards of the handful of Cardinal who have appeared in Houston over the years* but keeping track of everyone else? I have a hard time and it’s my own PC of guys who I watched play in college.

*Osuna, Bruntlett, Castro, Lowrie, and Hinch.

Lots of good stuff here too. Buechele and Castro stickers are definitely new. The Leaf Chitren is, surprisingly, also new to me. As are the Hammond Ultra, the Helling MVP and Metal Universes, and Hinch Victory. I’ve been focusing so much on mainline Topps issues that all these other brands are off my radar. It’s nice to have the samples and see how different they are compared to the Giants cards and I’m glad Marc’s an expert in this era of cards since so many people have no idea.

The Lonborg Swell is another great addition. Nice to have an action photo to go with all the portraits from his vintage cards. I also always like getting Topps Heritage. The brand is growing on me and I can enjoy it for what it does well even while it annoys me with some of its faux-retro styling. And I kind of miss those early Bowman years with the crazy foil borders.

A huge batch of Piscottys including a bunch of Donruss/Panini.* I don’t buy modern unlicensed Donruss cards so these are always fun to see in maildays since they’re a good bet to be brand new to me. The Topps Heritage (I’m assuming) card in the style of the late-60s/early-70s Topps Supers is my favorite here although the holiday card with the frozen waterslide amuses me more than it should.

*I never know what to call them.

The three Spragues included some Scores I never encountered as a kid and I wish I hadn’t already sent TTM requests to Stanicek and Williams since these would’ve been nice to include.

Four Scott Ericksons are a nice surprise. That they’re all from his time with the Orioles is especially welcome. I have a decent amount of his Twins cards but his later ones don’t show up in my collection.

I haven’t been hitting this project particularly hard. It’s become more of a passive collection where I will snag things as I come across them but am not looking to be comprehensive.

Now we’re getting to the fun part of the package. Marc was a member of the group of us who were making cards for the entire 2018 season. His set was one card per game plus complete roster, coaches, All Stars, and awards and he just finished earlier this month.

We’ve been sending each other samples from our sets. I sent him cards from the Astros games. He sent me cards where Stanford guys get mentioned—so both Hinch cards plus a game where the highlight was Stephen Piscotty hitting aa foul ball which got stuck in the stadium roof. I appreciate not getting cards from the season sweep that the Astros performed on the Giants.

Marc also included a couple other customs he made. The Hinch is in the style of 1962 Topps football. I’m not sure what the Castro is referencing but for all I know it could be jumping off of 1951 Bowman.

One of the things Marc and I have been discussing is how moving forward it’s becoming increasingly rewarding to make custom cards—both for ourselves and for other people. It’s a fun design challenge. It’s a gratifying photo editing experience. And for many of the people out on Card Twitter, making a custom of one of their favorite players is clearly a preferred way to thank them.

Marc decided to print his set professionally instead of doing so many cards at home. This was the correct decision but unfortunately he got tripped up by Acrobat’s “shrink to fit” defaults when he printed his first batch of cards. The result wasn’t a total loss since mini cards are one of those things that everyone likes and so Marc ended up with a bunch of fun mailday filler.

So I got mini cards of the five cards Marc intended to send me (full-size Hinch is included for scale) plus a couple of extras. Two of those extras are 1992 Bowman versions of some god-awful/wonderful photos from an Astros road trip in the early 1990s. Where 1991 Stadium Club and 1992 Topps had a few of these cards, 1992 Bowman featured so many photos of prospects in their peak-90s street clothes that it’s become the go-to template for any embarrassingly-dated fashion choices. The photos are hilarious. Putting them in the Bowman template makes them even funnier.

The other three are copies of my cards. Hunter Pence is the co-owner of Marc’s local coffee shop and Marc wanted to drop off a copy of my card featuring him saying good bye to the Giants faithful. I sent him a few JPGs of a couple different designs and they got caught up in the printing mishap. It’s fun to seem them as minis. It’s also fun to compare the difference in printing between Marc’s shop and Magcloud.

That’s not all though. This enigmatic team bag was quietly buried in the pile of other cards. Mark has sent stuff like this before but this is the first time something has been earmarked for the boys.

So I opened it up and found these. Marc obviously did more than just drop off some of my customs at the coffee shop. Let’s do some proper scans. Also I have a pretty good idea what’s hiding underneath all that blue painters tape now.

The boys will be very happy with this. Hunter Pence is a fan favorite for a reason and his Underpants nickname is precisely the kind of humor they love. I’m going to hold on to these for a while since my eldest has an autograph request out in the mail right now to Pat Neshek* and I don’t want to ruin the fun when that becomes his first active big league autograph.

*Yes this will be a post of its own once Neshek’s return gets here.

Pence will still be my son’s first Giants autograph and that will be special enough until he gets a Giants autograph in person.*

*His first Major Leaguer was Jay Bell last year.

And as I suspected once I saw the two signed 2015 Topps cards, I now have one of my customs signed. This is super cool. I’ve been sending out my customs to Spring Training since they’re fun to share. It’s wonderful to know that at least one player has seen them now.

I get the sense that the players truly appreciate the gesture and who knows, maybe in the next month or two I’ll have more signed customs in my autograph binder.

Thanks so much Marc! This mailer was awesome.

7 responses to “So Marc exploded my mailbox

  1. Bru is making a name for himself with those Panini stickers. They’re awesome! But as an autograph guy, I gotta admit the Hunter Pence signatures are a little cooler.

  2. Belatedly commenting, as always. A few footnotes to add.
    1. The card of Estes on the basepaths never fails to make me happy.
    2. None of those UD Doc cards even feature the right pitcher, much less the right game.
    3. The Piscotty ’69 “Super” is actually a 2016 Archives insert, which makes no sense as ’16 Archives uses the ’53, ’79, and ’91 sets.
    4. The Castro was one of my early customs, a riff on the ’51 Bowman football set (hence the nameplate + logo). I think originally I tried to make these proportional then I went to full card size.
    5. The ’62 FB customs are among my favorites that I’ve ever done. Those All-Stars from the set are definitely up there as well.
    6. The ’92 Bowman shots are of the Astros de-planing after the infamous 28-day road trip due to the 1992 RNC taking over the ‘Dome, so they’re even the right year. https://www.houstonchronicle.com/sports/texas-sports-nation/article/28-days-later-Astros-1992-odyssey-quite-11746567.php
    7. Oh come on, you didn’t think I was reallllly just going to print him copies now, did you? He did really enjoy the trio, though.
    8. I’m curious what you think of the final output quality on the customs, by the way.

    • Haha it WAS 51 Bowman but I just had the wrong sport.

      Customs output looks good. I’m somewhat biased against toner-based printers when it comes to things like this. This is my own hang-up and taste coming into play though. But it’s a good solid stock (which signs well) and colors all look pretty nice.

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