A pair of Giants

It’s funny. When I was going through my childhood collection I discovered that I’d gotten complete team sets for 1989 Topps, Donruss, Fleer, Score, and Upper Deck. Except that I totally missed Upper Deck’s Final/Extended high number series.* Oops. I’ve since accumulated a couple of the ones I was missing but Trevor Wilson and Charlie Hayes were the last two I needed.

*To be honest I don’t remember this series in 1989 at all.

A couple days ago this pair of 1989 Upper Deck Giants arrived courtesy of Steve Cornell. Thanks Steve! Random PWE mailings are the best. Even though both of these cards are kind of derpy it’s great to be able to scratch a set off my Giants Searchlist 30 years after the fact.

I should’ve paid more attention to my collecting interests as a kid. Giants team sets excited me. Oddballs—especially food issues—were my jam. But I never fully embraced that and so there’s lot of bycatch and filler that I need to go through.

I much prefer my modern collecting where I have much more clearly-defined projects and getting a pair of commons like these two excites me because they complete a team set that takes me back to that 1989 season and all the things I did as a Giants fan that year.

The Trevor Wilson also reminds me of the early 1990s when he was still one of those end-of-the-roster guys who got dragged out on community service duty.

Author: Nick Vossbrink

Blogging about Photography, Museums, Printing, and Baseball Cards from both Princeton New Jersey and the San Francisco Bay Area. On Twitter as @vossbrink, WordPress at njwv.wordpress.com, and the web at vossbrink.net

4 thoughts on “A pair of Giants”

  1. Although I don’t remember specifically the Hayes or Wilson in this post, I remember working at my LCS and having to explain the difference between the Low # and High # packs. At one point the High # packs were more popular, because they contained the Nolan Ryan football card, while still giving the collectors the chance to pull the famous Griffey. Eventually the Low # packs became more desirable, because they offered collectors a better chance of pulling the Griffey.

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