March Returns

A slow month. I didn’t send as much to spring training as I have in previous years and it looks like it was a good idea. A few teams weren’t accepting mail and my own success rate dropped way off the table. Instead I’ve been going through my junk wax duplicates and sending out cards of guys from the sets of my youth. Lots of players who have been forgotten in general but which I recognize because I spent hours looking at these cards.

The first return of the month was a 19-day return from Scott Fletcher. As I work through my junk wax duplicates I’m grabbing cards from sets that I like to get signed. Fletcher was a journeyman glove guy who was good enough to stuck around for a long time despite never really being a locked-in everyday player.

The next return of the month was Mike Stenhouse in 116 days. Same motivation as Fletcher although I kind of like this photo. Something very 1986 Topps about it in its candid informal nature of catching a moment of baseball ma.

It took a while but my first spring training return came back after 22 days of waiting. Not too long but by this point last year I’d already received all but two of my spring training returns. Which meant that I was starting to think I wouldn’t get any (two Return to Senders reached me before this return and the forums had stories about how a number of teams weren’t accepting mail this season).

As a result I was very pleased and very relieved to get these from Tyler Rogers. It’s always nice to add signed customs to the binder and last year’s “hide the Getty watermark” design looks pretty good with some ink. And the 2020 Heritage is probably as close to a signed 1971 I’ll get.

A nice 10-day return from Doug Sisk brought one of the better 1988 Topps photos into the collection. I like 1988’s photo-centric nature but the photos themselves are frequently on the boring side. Not bad. Just uninspired. Batters batting. Pitchers pitching. Players posing. The few fielding cards such as Sisk taking off to cover first stand out for being different and more dynamic.

Ed VandeBerg is one of those guys I remembered because his double last name seemed like it was written differently in every set. 1988’s VandeBERG in particular was always weird to my eyes. But it was nice to fill out a few more of my childhood cards with a quick 11-day return.

A 110-day return from Balor Moore added another 1978 duplicate to the binder. A nicely-lit portrait on this card looks really well with ink. Moore was the Expos’ first pick in the expansion draft.

My second spring training return was 28 days from 2020’s Opening Day catcher Tyler Heineman. Nice to get his Topps card signed in addition to another custom. A bit of a shame that the personalization covers his face though. I enjoy the personalized cards but the face signing is always a bit disappointing.

With Bart and Posey on the team this year, there’s not a lot of room for more catchers. As a result, Heineman is in St. Louis now and seems to have had a decent spring even though he didn’t make the team.

An 8 day return from Jack Lazorko returned things to my childhood card kick. Lazorko is sort of most famous for a highlight clip that used to play on This Week in Baseball. It’s still a fun video to watch and definitely seems like it’s from a different age of the game when it was okay to thing of pitchers as athletes.

Henry Cotto was another 8 day return. I couldn’t decide which Mariners card to send so I sent both. I like the candid photo but the sliding one is the kind of image that doesn’t show up on cards very often. Despite having been a coach in the Giants’ minor league system, Cotto is not going into my Giants binder.

Keith Miller came back in 19 days. There’s something about his 1992 card which just works. It’s kind of a weird photo but suggests a sense of anticipation. The horizontal aspect also works well and gave him a nice space to sign his name.

A 9 day return from Scott Bailes brought some more childhood cards into the collection. For whatever reason I look at these cards and think Bailes is a rookie but he’d been around the league for a while by this point and was even traded for Johnnie Lemaster back in 1985.

Mike Bielecki is one of those guys who I remember watching with a bunch of NL teams. Unfortunately I don’t have any Cubs cards of him—those all went to Beau years ago—but he bounced around to three teams which came through Candlestick while I was a fan. This return came back in 41 days.

Rafael Novoa never got a Major League win but this 1991 card does show his only career save on the back. He was only on the Giants in 1990 and this card came back in 18 days.

A quick 8-day return from Floyd Bannister brought in a 1985 card to the binder. While I’m still contemplating building 1985, I have been adding a few to the autograph binder and have been enjoying how those look signed as a group. It’s also nice to add some stuff outside of my wheelhouse to the childhood card requests that I’ve been making recently.

The last return of the month was a 49-day return from Charles Hudson. I continue to enjoy how the 1986 design looks signed. Hudson lives in Texas and I had sent this request out like a week before the cold snap which destroyed their power grid. I felt a bit guilty about that since I figured he had more important things to handle than answering fan mail. It’s very nice of him to have saved and answered his mail in that time.

And that’s about it. No idea what to expect for April. I’ve a bunch of Spring Training requests out there still. And I’ve sent a decent amount of childhood cards out. Those are fun to get back but not nearly as inspiring as the returns I’ve been used to getting.

What I’ve really go to do is fire up the custom card making machine again and start sending those out. Those remain the most enjoyable part of TTM requests and I’m overdue for a new batch.

Author: Nick Vossbrink

Blogging about Photography, Museums, Printing, and Baseball Cards from both Princeton New Jersey and the San Francisco Bay Area. On Twitter as @vossbrink, WordPress at njwv.wordpress.com, and the web at vossbrink.net

One thought on “March Returns”

  1. Ooo, the ’86 Hudson really is a beauty.

    That Lazorko clip is great. I think I knew that about him at one time but had forgotten. Makes you wonder if that sole ability helped him get promoted past other pitchers in the minors.

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