Category Archives: trades

Mailday from Shane

Despite the previous massive mailday, somehow Shane was able to surprise me with another massive batch of Giants cards. While obviously not as much fun as the previous mailing (that one took me months to sort through and figure out what everything was) there’s a lot of good stuff in here too.

A few 1980s–1990s cards from when I was collecting. The Topps UK Minis are especially fun. I’d not seen them before this year but have gradually acquired a number of them now through maildays. Pretty sure I’ve never seen that Fleer Exciting Stars card before either.

The rest of the Score, Upper Deck, and Leaf cards remind me of my collecting heyday. I might have them in a box at my parents’. I might not. (I’ve long lost my memory of all the cards I owned.) But these are the cards—and the players—I grew up with so it’s always a blast to see them again.

One of my growing collecting interests are cards which aren’t in English. O Pee Chee is pretty standard and for most of my youth was just a Canadian-branded version of Topps. It was cool enough that it was in white card stock instead of grey. And the bilingual French/English backs (also with Leaf in the 1980s before Donruss relaunched it as a premium brand in 1990) were pretty cool. O Pee Chee Premier followed the flagship/premium break that occurred in trading cards ~1990 and is the first time I saw non-Topps O Pee Chee cards.

I only recently discovered that Pacific’s MLB license was initially only for Spanish-language cards and that even after they started making English-language cards their Crown line was Spanish-only. Despite the Bay Area being a pretty significant Spanish-speaking market, I never saw these when they came out in 1993/1994. I’ve been semi-seeking them out now (I have a handful of giants from 1993/94) so having a 1997 Bonds is very cool.

On to late-1990s cards that represent a grab bag of different things that card companies were doing as they tried to figure out the post-strike landscape. We’ve got reprints. We’ve got retro-inspried designs. We’ve got budget versions of premium brands as a response to the regular brands creating premium releases. I continue to look at checklists from this era and be confused.

And Shane sent me a ton of Topps flagship starting with 2000. This is great since I don’t have any coverage from these years and while getting sets is out of the question, having Giants is a good way to stay on top of things. 2000 is notable for being the first year at Pac Bell Park so these cards represent some of the last images of Candlestick as a baseball venue.

Also. Yes. That’s a Robb Nen autograph. I need to ask Shane about the backstory here but that’s definitely the highlight of the mailday. I never took to Nen the way I took to Rod Beck but after what he did, and gave, to the team in 2002 I think all Giants fans respect him.

2001 Topps means many of these are the first photos from Pac Bell. The Robb Nen card here is the most-distinct of the ones I received in that it shows triples alley. Also, While I’ve tended to side-eye a lot of Topps’s 1990s–2000s designs, this one is growing on me. As individualy cards the green/grey border feels wreid. But seeing them all together like this and that color provides a nice page background for the photos.

I’m not a fan of the 2002 design though. If the dark green has a certain class to it, this orange/brown is an eyesore. All the swirly ribbons don’t help either. This is a shame since I should probably get this team set as it represents the team which came as close as I ever expected to get to a World Series title.

Yes that game 6 loss still hurts a little even though we’ve won three times this decade and winning a steroid-tained title would’ve sat uncomfortably.

2003 and 2005 Topps. the highlight here is the Matt Cain Prospects card. I’ve kind of forgotten these years in a blur of horrible news coverage where what Barry Bonds did outweighed what the team did. It was increasingly hard to be a fan and the Bonds circus caused me to start drifting away.

These sets are similarly forgettable. Topps is obviously going through a phase of knowing that foil stamping and high gloss are the hallmarks of premium cards but they haven‘t figured out how to consistently combine them into designs which work well.

I can’t imagine how unbearable the Bonds Hype must’ve been for everyone else during those years. That Topps released a set where each card represents one of Barry’s home runs continues to amaze me in its hilarious awfulness. I’m definitely not seeking to complete this set but I’m glad that I’ve moved past my frustration with those years to see the humor in it.

And that 2006 Topps set is also pretty dire. If the knock on a lot of the sets from 1976–1985 is that they’re boring white-bordered sets, at least they’re simple designs which have aged relatively well. These mid-200s Topps designs though? Yeesh. Too many things going on on each card.

2007 is better. I don’t like the design but it’s got a better handle on what it’s doing. I’m baffled as to why the team card has the red and blue squares switched (the backs are all oriented the same way). And yes those two Zitos have different colored backs. This whole parallel/short print thing where Topps changes the color of something minor and treats it as something special really bothers me. If you’re going to do this kind of artificial scarcity crap at least do it with photo variations.

I really like the 2008 design. Kind of surprised about it but it reaches back into the past and does something which is reminiscent of 1964, 1972, and 1986 yet in a way which isn’t at all copying them. The only thing I don’t like is the little tab where the Topps logo is. Even the printed autographs are a nice change of pace (although as an autograph collector I generally don’t like them).

Sadly the 2009 design is a step backwards again. And that’s a 2010 Ginter mini which is fun but also represents a line of cards which isn’t my thing.

And to more-recent cards. The Minor League Heritage cards intrigue me. I don’t really like the Heritage thing but for some reason it bothers me less with minor league teams. I do enjoy having representative samples of the various Archive and Heritage releases though.

The Christian Arroyo 1968 Topps Game design is especially interesting in how different it is—larger size and thicker card stock—from the actual 1968 cards. I am also amused at the specificity of “Lead Runner and Batter Out” for the double play (yes I know this is accurate to the original).

Shane also included some more-random stuff. Fleer stickers are fun. I think this is from 1987 based on the team logo on the other side. The small one must be from a minis set. I’ve never seen anything like it before. And the 49ers cards are fun too. I’ve long since given up on the NFL but cards which remind me of the 1980s when I was a fan—I was a 49er fan before I was a Giants fan actually—will always be enjoyable.

The coin is a 1969 Citgo coin of Willie McCovey. The back has a gob of glue stuck to it but it’s a neat little object all the same. I don’t think we had Citgos on the West Coast (it’s certainly a brand I’m not familiar with) so these coins also represent a cool regional oddball as well.

Thanks Shane! I hope my package gets out of USPS purgatory* sometime this year. It’s not nearly as cool as this, or the previous mailday, but it is indeed enjoyable to send people things that’ll make them happier than they made me.

*Note. Never, ever, make a mistake on the zip code.

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Mailday from Al

Where many of my maildays have involved trading with people who I’ve gotten to know through baseball card twitter, sometimes someone will just post a call out about looking to clear out some space and get rid of some cards.* In this case, Al (@lamachine21) was** in the midst of a move, found a bunch of fun stuff that he preferred to clear out, and asked for people to send him their favorite team. So I did—expecting to some day receive a bunch of junk wax nostalgia that would make me smile and which I’d love to share with my kids.

*Peter was one such case and I’m very happy to have been able to keep corresponding with him on twitter and through maildays.

**Actually still is. 

Al certainly didn’t disappoint here. 1986–1994 covers my collecting years perfectly. The 1986 cards represent both the of my collecting consciousness and that Will Clark is one of the first cards I really coveted. Yes I eventually got it. But that doesn’t make me any less happy to see it show up unexpectedly in a stack of cards.

The 1990 cards are all wonderful since they represent so much of the pennant-winning 1989 team which will always have a special place in my heart. The way the Kevin Mitchell is—totally deservedly—the face of the team this year for a change. That Trevor Wilson card with the photo from the celebration. The Dravecky card and all the baggage it carries with respect to both the comeback from cancer game, the subsequent arm-breaking game, and the knowledge that he’d eventually have to get the amputation.

And after getting a couple of the 1954 reprints from Bru it was great fun to get some 1953 reprints (and cards that never were). I loved these as a kid. I, sadly, have no 1953 cards to compare to today so these are still a reminder of how much getting pre-1960 cards is something I should never take for granted.

The new (to me at least) stuff is also great. As a skeptic of these neue-retro cards I’m glad that people keep sending me samples so I don’t have to buy them. In this case, the Fleer and Bowman retro designs are fun to see even while they don’t quite do it for me. I find it interesting how much the Fleer is aping 1956 Topps. I wish they’d taken the Topps Big approach and made a design which translated the look to present (or in this case ~2000) rather than continuing to try to be retro.

Victory kind of weirds me out since it’s copyrighted to UpperDeck but has none of the branding. I was out of the hobby when this came out but from what I can tell there was a trend around 2000 when, after upscaling their products card companies tried to release a less-complicated lower-end product. That none of these sets seem to have lasted for more than a handful of years says more to me about the strength of the flagship lines of cards—what I tend to call the “cards of record”—and how those are the threads that allow collectors to indulge the way baseball cards connect us to baseball’s past.

Gaylord Perry 2004 Donruss

The first 24 items were enjoyable enough. This Gaylord Perry autograph though? Totally cool. Totally unexpected. I admit to not being a big fan of relics or chase cards. But if it’s a player whose number is retired by my team?* Hard to resist.

*Note, the Giants only retire your number if you’re in the Hall of Fame. 

Given the construction of this card I’m certain this is a sticker autograph. But I appreciate that the diecut on the top layer hides the sticker business. The entire card feels like a cohesive product rather than something that’s just a clear sticker slapped on top of a regular trading card. And yes, I completely understand how the sticker thing allows for all kinds of flexibility from the card companies, it just doesn’t feel right to me.

The downside of the diecut stuff is that this card is too thick to go into a standard 9-pocket sleeve. As with the relic card I’ve just got it in a top loader for now while I figure out what to do with it. I should probably ask around and see what other people do with these.

1983 Donruss Action All Stars 1983 Donruss Action All Stars

Al also threw in an unopened pack of 1983 Donruss Action All Stars because Greg Minton is visible through the wrapper. I have some of these at my parents’ house. This is a set I always liked because large cards are cool (these are 3½”×5″) even though a lot of the real estate on the card front is wasted on the TEAMTEAMTEAM greyspace.

I’ll hold off on opening this pack until I get 4-pocket pages. I don’t need a huge pack of them so I’ll have to visit a card shop to get smaller quantities. Until then keeping these in the pack will keep them under control. I’ll get to admire the Minton and the back of the George Brett until then.

So Thanks Al. I’ve got someone new to follow on twitter and figure out what kind of thank you is appropriate to send. But that’ll have to wait for a while since he’s in the midst of a move. Moves suck even if everything goes according to plan so even more power to him for being so generous in mailing out so many care packages.

Mailday from Bru

Another semi-surprise mailday, this time from Bru, an Astros fan and photographer who I’ve enjoyed discussing the photo-side of baseball cards with. I knew a mailday was in the works and have been pulling oddball Astros, or Astro-related cards from my collection to send in return. But then Hurricane Harvey dumped a shitload of rain on Houston and I was just hoping that he and Bob would pull through okay.

Anyway, as a result I was very surprised to find a bubble mailer in my mailbox this week. And it was a treat indeed to open it up.

A few fun cards from the 1980s. Krukow and Uribe in particular were—and still are—fan favorites.

And a handful of cards from the early 1990s when I was still collecting cards. I may or may not have these and will have to double check my holdings back in California. I’m reasonably sure I don’t have the Stadium Club as that stuff was spendy and I only got a couple of packs in general. And the two Bonds cards also don’t look familiar at all.

Another handful of 1990s cards which are from after I stopped collecting. Good. God. I’ve yet to run into any collectors who liked 1995 Fleer. Now I see why. This was my first in-person 1995 Fleer experience and yeah, I have no urge to acquire any more of these. I’m glad to have these as a reminder of how bad things got when I was out of the hobby though.

I’ve also handled a few 1990s Topps Finest now (there were a few in Shane Katz’s box too) and I have to admit that I don’t understand this set at all. It’s like once card companies realized that nice full-bleed photography should be the status quo they had no idea what should count as high end anymore.

And a bunch of more-recent cards. I not the biggest fan of Gipsy Queen or Allen & Ginter but it’s nice to have a sampling of them. I’m grateful that that sampling is turning out to be Giants. I also enjoy that I’ve been gradually filling up Giants from the first half of the 2010s with all these maildays since those World Series winning teams obviously hold a special place in my heart.

Matt Williams 1994 Sportflics Barry Bonds 1994 Sportflics Barry Bonds 1994 Sportflics

Now to the really fun stuff. For some reason I stopped collecting Sportflics before 1994. I really shouldn’t have. These remain fun in a wonderfully distinct way and my kids really like them even though they only have two frames of action now. Something about the tactile nature of having to interact with these in order to get them to move is much more exciting than just watching a video on the iPad. They were impressed and maybe I’ll have to get them some Sportflics or their own to rip.

I also appreciate these 1954 reprints a lot more now that I have the real 1954 cards to compare them to (the 1954 Don Liddle was not part of the mailday). It’s nice to see them in the high-gloss printing. I should look into getting more of these now—especially the gold variants with the gold signatures. The only weird thing for me is that the backs are no longer full-bleed.

Joe Strain 1980 KNBR San Francisco Police Department Joe Strain 1980 KNBR San Francisco Police Department

And the best card in the mailday is this 1980 KNBR San Francisco Police Department card which Bru reports was sitting in a bucket in a junk shop while his card was getting its post-Harvey cleaning. I’ve never seen these and have felt a bit jealous of Tony and all his Brewers Police cards. While I had Mother’s Cookies to enjoy instead there’s something about police cards and their bizarre insistence on being non-standard overlarge sizes with most of that extra card space being empty paper.

In this case I especially like the inanity of the tip on the back. I think my 8-year-old son would roll his eyes hard at this. I appreciate them trying to educate about safety tips but I can’t imagine this approach ever working. At least the card itself grew up to be supercool. I need to put a stack of Astros together to send back to Houston now.

1973 Mailday

A small mailday from Jeff Katz (@SplitSeason1981) prompted by his recent SABR post where he was looking for trading partners. Jeff’s looking for 1960s cards and has a ton of 1970s cards. I’m not a good fit as my collection is heavily 1987–1993 and I’m both looking for anything before then and have pretty much nothing from then.

That SABR post turned into a chance to send Jeff all of our wants and haves and, since I do have a few duplicates from my eBay acquisitions it turned out that Jeff and I could still do a small trade. So we sent off our respective plain white envelopes loaded with a couple cards and this is what I got.

1973 Topps

1973 is one of the team sets I can actually see feasibly completing* so anything which gets me closer to that goal is always greatly appreciated. I am really digging that Garry Maddox card even with the tilted horizon.

*Between the high numbers and Willie Mays I’m pretty sure I won’t be able to able to complete anything before 1970.

Also, the Boyhood Photos of the Stars card is one which I was really intrigued by when I was a kid. This is partly because Chris Speier had just returned to the Giants when I came onboard as a fan and the idea that he’d been with the team 15 years earlier fascinated me. But I also really liked the idea of seeing what the ballplayers looked like when they were my age.

This is a subset or idea that I’d love to see in a set like Topps Bunt which is aimed and priced for kids. I can totally see my sons having a lot of fun with it.

Blast from the past

A-blast-from-the-past mailday from Peter at Baseball Every Night. In his box break mailing earlier this year he’d hinted that he had a bunch of old Giants cards he was going to send for my kids. So while not unexpected, I didn’t know when to expect the second mailing—or how large of a mailing to expect. These arrived when I was out chasing the eclipse and I’ve only just received the package.

It’s a very generous assortment of cards, many of which are from the sets I used to collect when I was little. I enjoy that so many of these are well-loved. Not abused, just beat up from constant handling. I have a few cards like this in my collection too. Maybe it was a playground acquisition which had to be keep in a pocket or someplace else.* Maybe it was part of a favorite stack to show anyone who’d listen.** Maybe it’s a legacy of the beginning of a collection before binders and pages and learning the “correct” way to store things.***

*I vividly remember keeping cards in my pulled-up socks and unpeeling them from my shin when I got home.

**A phase my eldest son is currently going though.

***As a parent, the best thing about binders and pages is that they encourage the kids to clean up and put their collections away instead than leaving stacks of cards lying around.

Looking at them now brings a smile to my face the same way that looking through @captnarrr’s cards did—especially since they’re all Giants. It’s fun to see these old names and a lot of these cards are cards I either got autographed or tried to get autographed. I know the boys will enjoy incorporating them into their collection since they’re still very much into copying whatever I did. And while I definitely want to encourage them to branch into their own interests it’s nice to have some common ground as well.

I also can’t help but notice how many of those cards feature the Turn Back the Clock uniforms. I loved seeing those on cards when I was a kid. I’m making a note to myself to assemble a checklist of Giants cards featuring those uniforms.

I got out of collecting in 1994. I have a bunch of cards from that year but they never made it into binders and I had even forgotten most of the designs until I pulled my collection out of storage this summer. So I’m nowhere near as familiar with these cards. I do like how so many focus on photography and keep the designs simple. And I really like the Salomon Torres card even though he’s not the best of Giants fan memories.

Peter also included ten new cards. The McCovey Stadium Club is fantastic. But then that whole set is great even though I can’t help but laugh at also getting a Marvin Denard Span card. My sons will greatly appreciate the Topps Bunt cards. Bunt isn’t a set for me but I got a blaster for them to share and they’ve enjoyed ripping packs and seeing who they got. They can never have enough Giants.

The two Topps Archives cards are also fun. I’m not a fan of the way Topps reuses old designs—it falls into an uncanny valley of looking like both a lousy copy and a lazy homage—but I have a soft spot for the 1991 design.* This is also my first Hoyt Wilhelm card ever. I’ve been remiss in getting any of his cards in my Giants team set quest.

*I’m willing to make the argument that 1991 is the best set Topps has made from a design and photography point of view. And yes I checked the backs of these to see if Topps Archives pulled a UV glow backs shout out.

I need to specifically mention the two gold Matt Duffy parallels in that group of ten. I was very surprised to see that they are sequentially numbered. Peter insists that he was even more surprised when he pulled them out of random packs. My gut is skeptical but my brain can’t come up with any other scenarios for this either.

Anyway, I need to brainstorm on how to thank Peter for this. Last time I was able to send some neat Darryl Strawberry and John Kruk cards. This time? I’ll need to be more creative.

Someone Else’s Childhood

One of my twitter contacts, upon seeing that I was collecting baseball cards again, realized that he could send me his childhood collection as it would both get it out of his house and ensure that it would go to a good home. So one evening I found a beat up Priority Mail box filled with sheets of baseball cards and a surprise Everett Aquasox cap.*

*I’ve actually been to a ballgame in Everett game back when the club was the Everett Giants.

It’s a weird thing to be entrusted with someone else’s childhood. In the same way that I feel odd about dismantling and re-sorting and mixing my childhood collection with all my new (to me) cards, I also feel weird about immediately re-sorting these ones. With my cards I had to take a few months to reacquaint myself with both the cards and my memory of them. Only after doing so was I able to consider how I might want to reorganize everything.

With @captnarrr’s? I don’t know. Part of me wants to really look through and get to know his collection. Another part feels like that’s getting too personal (if that makes sense). I don’t know. It’s weird. I know how much my collection meant to me as a kid and I feel like that kid-level anxiety about someone else flipping through your collection is lurking deep down inside all of us.

So I’m going to try and find the happy middle ground of looking through these a few time and getting used to them as a collection while trying not to really examine everything. I’m also not going to photograph or scan anything beyond a few representative pages.

I’ve flipped through a couple times so far and it’s eerily similar to mine in terms of what it covers. Especially in the 1986–1988 coverage. I have ~250 1986 Topps cards. So does he. I’ve been meaning to take a run at that set since it’s the first I bought packs for but hadn’t gotten into the hobby fully yet. Hopefully I won’t have too many duplicates between his stack and mine.

The 1987–1988 cards though will become a starter set for my kids (between these and the massive amount of 1987 and 1988 Topps duplicates I have as well I would be shocked if there wasn’t another complete set in here). I have complete sets for both years—1987 was my first serious year collecting—but revisiting all these cards just takes me back. Even with Topps beating the 1987 design into the ground this year.

The big difference is in how he organized things. I was a by-the-numbers kid. Card backs had card numbers and you were obviously supposed to page them in numerical order. Flipping through pages organized by player or team, while it makes sense to me, also feels oddly wrong since it’s not how I’m used to looking at these sets.

This is funny since my current project is focusing just on one team and I’m organizing each year’s team set in my binder alphabetically rather than numerically.

1981 Fleer 1981 Fleer

There’s also a decent amount of 1981 and 1982 cards in here. I have maybe a pack’s worth for each of these sets. Sot it’s fun to have more of them. Admittedly, 1981 and 1982 Fleer are both pretty lousy sets but there’s something kind of charmingly unprofessional about them which appeals to me in today’s crisp over-produced world.

Ken Griffey Jr Bar Ken Griffey Jr Bar
Ken Griffey Jr Bar back

The most interesting stuff in the box though are the oddballs and regional issues. These weren’t in pages so they’re easier to scan. The standouts are the Ken Griffey Jr bar cards. I’ve never seen these in the wild although I remember them existing in all that Juniormania in 1989. Seeing a couple different versions is very cool. Then seeing how the backs state that they’re available “Throughout the Northwest” is wonderful since it takes these back to being a purely regional thing even though I know the bars went around the country.

Tony Gwynn Base Hit Candy Bar Tony Gwynn Base Hit Candy Bar back
Wade Boggs .352 Bar Wade Boggs .352 Bar back

Unlike the Griffey bars I had never heard of the Gwynn and Boggs bars. These look to be the same product but released in 1990. Kind of a shame they’re all just plain milk chocolate but I do like how the font changes for each one. Also it’s nice that the Boggs photo is a more interesting action than just a batting stance.

Brian McRae Denny's Hologram Kal Daniels Denny's Hologram Barry Bonds Denny's Hologram
Jeff Bagwell Denny's Hologram Sammy Sosa Denny's Hologram

Denny’s holograms are always cool. I was out of the hobby by 1995 so I never saw the 1995 versions in the flesh. While I enjoy the full-hologram versions more the scans of the 1995 cards don’t do justice to the depth in the hologram. But this  is a series of sets which I’m very much likely to chase as well so the more of these that I come across the easier that chase will be.

Manager's Dream: Tony Oliva, Chico Cardenas, Roberto Clemente

I think this was the only pre-80s card in the collection. It’s a beaut despite the miscut. I found it interesting that this featured three latino players but feels as if Topps was planning something along those lines and then decided to go with something generic. Or maybe they just couldn’t come up with a decent nickname.

1986 All Star Glossy

I’ve not seen team photos in the All Star Glossies. I should probably research when that stopped being a thing because these are pretty cool. I always love looking at the All Star team photos and seeing all the different uniforms together.

Roy Thomas autographed busines card

And Roy Thomas is an interesting autograph. Not a player I’m familiar with. I like that it’s a business card with a baseball card printed on it. I’m a bit curious what Thomas Enterprises was since it seems like his main post-career gig was being a middle-school teacher. I’m also a bit curious about about the context in which this autograph was acquired but I don’t really want to get into asking all kinds of questions about this collection.

All in all a very cool mailing which I’ll have fun flipping through and sorting in the future. And in the short term I’ll have to think about how to properly thank @captnarrr for the package.

Now With 49ers

A semi-surprise mailday from Andrew (@earthtopus). He’s a Tampa Bay fan/collector who focuses on the Bucco Bruce Creamsicle era. It’s no surprise that his plain white envelope was a bit of silliness and a bit of trolling.

I’m not a football card collector nor am I really a football fan anymore. But these are all from the era when I did care, sometimes a lot, about the 49ers and it’s fun to be reminded of that part of my youth.

Steve Young

1987 Topps Steve Young. I totally missed “the ”Now With 49ers” when I opened the envelope and thought this was just meant to be an amusing look at Young as a Buccaneer. Seeing that minuscule “traded” stamp makes it even funnier as this is technically now the first card of Young as a 49er. I don’t remember much about him in those first seasons with the Niners beyond never feeling comfortable when he had to sub in for Joe Montana.

Football Brothers: Chris and Matt Bahr

But the Young card makes a nice pair, of sorts, with this 1982 Topps card. Andrew just had to remind me of Matt Bahr 15–49ers 13. While that wasn’t how I remembered the game (Roger Craig’s fumble hurt me more), I never really put together that that was also Montana’s last real 49ers game too. Which means it also marks the beginning of the Steve Young era.

Tampa Bay Play Action Tampa Bay Play Action 1978 Topps

LOL this is hilariously dire. I appreciate that Fleer included Tampa in its 1978 set of football action but the dig on the back about “finally broke into the victory column” makes it seem like it took them three seasons to finally win a game instead of the 0–26 record they had before winning their first.

Doug Wiliams

The 1981 Topps Sticker of Doug Williams wasn’t meant to be silly. As with seeing Steve Young as a Buc, it’s also weird to see Williams as one since we’re all used to him with Washington.

1992 Pro Set Spirit of the Game 1992 Pro Set Spirit of the Game

What the hell is going on in 1992 ProSet? Is that a fake bottle of rum and a plastic child’s katana standing in for a dagger? And putting a glossy spin on there being two Steve DeBerg eras? Sheezus. I may not like Malcolm Glazer but I’m happy for any Tampa fans who stuck with the team through thin and thin until that Super Bowl.

Mark Carrier 1991 Pro Set Mark Carrier

This spanish-language 1991 ProSet card on the other hand has me jealous that there weren’t any real spanish-language cards for baseball at this time. Googling around lead me into discovering Pacific though so now I have a potential new collecting lead to run down for baseball cards. And I get to indirectly thank Andrew for that rabbit hole.